20141123

blog20141123

Last night featured an outing with friends. We met at the Pearl of India for the chef's special. It was a blast as far as a friendship meeting of eight goes. I am certain that everyone was pleased to meet each other and enjoy the specials served by the chef and his staff. I know we will enjoy many returns to the establishment. Today was a relative loss. We slept all day even though I had a bath at about noon. The crawling back into bed made me worry about the dampness I brought with me. My pillow took a wetting from my dripping hair that the large towel didn't get. I know I had dreams, but I forget them quite quickly. Besides, they were not the sort of imagery that I would relish remembering anyways. Meanwhile there is such a passage of time. Speaking of dreams, I scanned through a high glossy commercial railroad modeller's magazine. The wonderful collection of close up pictures added beautifully to the reviews and tips about scale model building and collecting. I have already had two sessions of reading the magazine that was bought only yesterday. It is actually a great resource of adds and links to surprising connections. I have a small collection of HO scale buildings and sheds that I have constructed and detailed over the years. It is a great pasttime if you want to detail a panorama around a HO scale train layout. So many ideas float in my imagination while I struggle to get motivated enough to do anything. The trouble with procrastination is that it really isn't a way to do anything.

20140812

blog20140812

I can’t believe my desk looks like a spilled over garbage barrel. What a load of crap that I have to dig through just to find a measly little tube of glue. I hate this mess and can’t seem to do anything about it. It is like the carpets that need vacuuming and the stacks of dishes that need washing. I don’t even eat properly because of my concern about the mess I live in. I spent two hours working on two little HO scale trucks that will go into the panorama of the HO scale train set. I have quarter inch pieces of foil scattered on my desk around my keyboard. I couldn’t cut the foil properly with scissors nor Xacto knife. The failed attempts are the tiny and shiny little oblongs on my desktop. Some even made it to the carpet under me on my electric wheelchair. Ha! I have only three Stuka bombers ready to hang from the ceiling in one of the bedrooms. I don’t know which bedroom as of yet, however it will be in a formation. Stukas always flew in a formation of three or more. Never did they fly out on missions alone. There simply wasn’t enough flight maneuverability nor machine guns to protect the old fashioned single engine fighter bombers. It is the real reason I made three of the Stukas instead of just one. Right! It has been months since I last worked with paper and dope. I know it smells a lot so I will wait until I can open the door or something. It is frustrating to sit and wait in this messy dump of a desktop. So many things have been added to my list of things to do. Meanwhile, a ME 109b sits with a wing broken off by accident and my right elbow. It was just one of those days when I should have cried instead of tried.

20140419

blog20140419

It's just another day when the clouds cover the blue sky as I go through another day. I have so much to do and nothing left of my energy to do it with. Can you imagine just how hard it is to try to do nothing with nothing? It's like watching a movie without the disc in the player. It is also like trying to watch something without the Internet. Where to begin is the hardest question. I have a wire brush to use for cleaning my hair brush. The wire brush is small enough to get down to the base of the bristles and loosen up the hair and dandruff packed mess that coated the hair brush. I suspect that there is a lot of soap grease binding the hair into tight knots that stick onto the hair brush bristles. It is an amazing sight and smell that comes off the hair brush as it is being cleaned. It only takes a few minutes to do the job of cleaning. There are other things that need cleaning around here. One thing is the carpet of the living room. It has a mess of potatoe chips and crumbs on and around the sofa where we watched a movie. There is even an empty pop bottle of the two liter size sitting on the window sill. I suppose that one day we will clean up things. It isn't like the stacks of dishes that are piled up in the kitchen. It is Saturday, the day before Easter. We have no chocolate eggs nor Easter bunny to cook for tomorrow's supper. i KNOW we plan to go to a friend's place for a BBQ meal and celebration of Easter. It will brighten up the day for our friend, for sure, eh? I have no idea of what I will wear. I have a sort of uniform that I wear because of the thickness of material and ease of comfortable fashion. I have thick tights under sweat pants and a cotton shirt under a sweater. I don't go for style when I want so much to be warm.

20120501

30 April 2012

Saturday past was an exciting adventure out to a Perth Maple Fest. We were up and gone by the crack of dawn and doing high speed antics out on the big road. It was nothing serious, but we did see a few flawed driving practices that come along by bad habit, speed control, and outright ignorance of circumstances. Now, who would have thought that a car sat right beside you for a ten mile stretch before you tried to occupy that same occupied space. It is how two solid masses come into contact at a great rate and extended insurance cost. Damned society of stupidity anyways. Saturday was a very busy pancake breakfast with sausages in a flood of maple syrup. Afterall, it is a maple fest. And fest there was. My what a fest that lasted from about 6:30 am until about 11:00 am. There was a steady flow of pancakes and people going through the Legion hall as quickly as the parking spaces emptied out. The bloated stomachs and their people wandered up and down the length of Main street. It was packed as tightly as shoppers could stand, going from one little vendor to another in search of the best deals, the right prices and the right articles. I am not so sure that the cash flow was as freely available as the cashiers would have liked, owing to the depressed markets and steep delivery costs. That little burg is way the heck and gone down the big road from the center of civilization and supply. Right. Sunday was a day of rest. We slept through it until late into the evening. By then, it was too late to do anything anyways. So, back to bed and the poor cats were left to play by themselves with a dark TV and no noise coming from the upstairs party goers. Monday was much the same thing with a huge overdose of coffee in an attempt to kickstart off the day. )O so it didn’t work, eh. And another day bit the dust. The one thing about Monday was the dream that forced it’s way into my conscious awareness. I did not intend to have any sort of dream, but it was a play on either past experiences or of future possibilities. There is a long list of past that tries to force the future into playing along, but it hardly ever affects the outcome of destiny over fate. The Gods of Chance are having at it again in an attempt to recreate an actual randomly precipitated incident in all of those obtuse patterns on which everything so depends. Now, who would believe that the Gods of Chance would even think such a thing. The dream started off with the full blast of capabilities turned on in one hundred percent efficiency as an object materialized out of the darkness over a sea of rock salt growths as tall as trees. It was an old land with an old history buried in deep sleep below those edifices of brittle and sharp crystals. Pools of rich mineral water had created those columns of growth that hid the remnants of intelligence. It had all come from somewhere for a reason. The team of archaeologists and tactical support had found the mother lode of old junk that had been buried in ages past. The once bountiful planet of gases and liquids on it’s surface had long since evaporated away into space leaving behind a sterile cinder. Dust kicked up at every step of my airtight armoured and automated, dual tracked survival pod. My aerial whipped past an old crystal formation to jerk the survival pod on it’s tracks. At the same moment, an object appeared hovering over a distant ridge of the crystal formations. I scanned frequencies to find a resonant reflect in passive mode. Light does have it’s telltale limitations according to whatever materials that can be identified. Simultaneous trace energy radiated off the object as it tried to scan the area in it’s vicinity. It couldn’t detect me although I knew it was there, searching and very actively communicating with a much larger companion object. Both objects were advanced armed and armoured scouts for a considerable force of exploratory and invasive military group. Both objects were battle damaged and wary of anything that moved as being hostile until proven otherwise. Bad, bad day was in the reckoning for any hostile. Internal system checks were not completed while outward communications were active. Internal system counters were adjusted and system failures were identified. A few subroutines were rerouted through alternative networks. A final check was made of subsystem routines before another calibration of the internal system counters was made. The internal work on the objects were stabilized and completed before an initial query was made. The nearby little object seemed to understand that it had been serviced and the repairs were helpful in it’s overall efficiency. The larger object was becoming aware that something had happened to the smaller companion object. The smaller object was somehow improved with increased efficiency. Perhaps there was a proximity to native crystal resources that had made a difference in communications. Nothing appeared to be moving or present in a possibly hostile situation. Curious. The two objects were suddenly aware that a team of scientific explorers had been found. Possibly there were more of the team at large in the area of the vast crystal growths. At that moment, reactive tension increased to the realization that possibly one more member of the scientific group had been encountered. It took long moments before I was identified as being an unarmed noncombatant that had effected passive repairs to both of the objects. Longer moments passed while I was located and identified physically by my location in the crystal growth formations. I wasn’t moving or even trying to hide my position in the cover provided by the formidable growths of crystal minerals. Ah! Pain! My body surged up on a wave of pain as I tried to move my limbs. Pain! Pain seared my mind as I tried to get control of one limb at a time. Muscles were rigid and stretched over my bones in drumhead tautness. I had to stretch the already tightly stretched muscles in the effort to free them from their rigidly frozen positions. Slowly I began freeing myself from the flatness of the mattress and the bulk of the sheets and comforters piled thickly over me. The dream and it’s complexities were lost on the waves of the pain that was reality and my actual awakening. I struggled to try to remember where I was in the dream, what was going on, and what I was doing before the pain erased the fragile traces of the dream. The dream receded before the onslaught of neurological activity caused by the presence of activated pain receptors. Pain! Monday wasn’t a blue day. Monday was a do day. I had things to do and it was important that I get my buns moving up and off the fart sack that was the bed. I had things to do that were in concerted concern with the paperwork that had to be done. There is always paperwork and the paper trail of proofs that must exist. Besides, there were other things that I wanted to do, too. Monday.

20120418

19 April 2012

You wouldn't think that staying up all night is that easy to do. But, it happened to me again when I didn't make it into the damned bed once again. I do want to stretch out in the soft warm comfort of the bed that is a field of dreams by night and a flat soft area for two big felines to stretch out. Cats do know where their most comfortable places are. There is something beautiful about two big old cats who are not afraid of anything within their little worlds. Ok, so there is the flash of lightening and the mighty roar of thunder that does make them scramble for cover and safety. Twister comes racing up to me and slides to stop with plaintive mews of clearly afraid crying for help. She knows that I am her guardian and protector against anything that might possibly hurt her. I soothe her and calm her nerves with my own purring and other assurances. I do have more of a connection with primitive animals than I care to admit. I know what it is to run wild through a wilderness with wolves ahead and behind on the same path. I know I used to be able to run with the wind when I was younger. Now, I have trouble to even stand up without depleting my oxygen level. I still remember so many times with my horse named Tarbaby. Seven gaits for dressage competition made her look so damned magnificently beautiful and impressively smart. She was fourteen point two hands tall and as smart as a six year old kid for all her intelligence. Still, she was a horse and she knew it. For all of that, I was her companion and caretaker, teacher and trouble maker. We played together at all kinds of games with so many tricks. Gads, I remember so much of my past still. Time wanders on as I go from one thing on to another thing in a flurry of activity and as often in a fearful fleeing from nightmares that do walk in the day time. There is something that puts the fear into me like nothing else. I only know that it does try to stalk me through time, trying to follow where I go while staying lost and hidden in the past. Every once in a while I catch a glimpse of it trying to catch up to me on a highway somewhere. I have seen a shadow flit from one moment into the next as it hides from view. It is still years, decades away in the past as it slowly pursues me. I know I am hunted. War is a fatal ending of so many and so much. War is a total loss for everyone who lives, participants or not. Soldiers live and die as they do in actions of combat on land, and in the air or the sea. How desperately life clings on in a fatally wounded way whether hunted or hunter. No distinction exists between living and dying for one side or another in the fields of conflict. Death is simply that, the ending of living. Who could possibly die and fall down in defeat, only to rise up and carry on like Lazarus Long. Miracles do occur that astound even the Dharma King. I spent more than a week during the year 2004 under the healing care of the Dharma king in Mississauga. Millions of devotees line up for a glimpse of the Dharma king while I was in his presence for more than a week. How rare is that? More, how rare was the miraculous healing that he brought about for me. I know that I should have died so many times and that I carried terrible wounds to cause me such suffering. Only the Dharma king could have known anything about my wounds and how to heal them. I know that there are many things I am not supposed to remember. I know that some of those past events and circumstances were not concluded as they should have been. Instead, there are a few things that can and will carry on in my future. How and when those events will come to pass are not for me to know, rather they are possible futures that may or may not happen. Meanwhile I still dodge the shadow that haunts me from the past where it hides as a lurking wraith. I do try to forget, keeping my mind busy with simple tasks. I am always alert until I fall asleep in exhaustion. I sleep in short naps, barely letting my body recover enough to carry on. A full sleep is something I dare not allow for fear of letting my past catch up to me. How else could I explain that I am intent on keeping ahead of myself. It does and has made a difference somehow. Somehow I have avoided a dire fate, possibly that wraith that still hunts in widening circles behind my travels. When miles become years that have passed like pickets of a fence, I stride to stay ahead of where I should be, ahead of whatever lurkes behind me. I do keep myself busy even as I race to stay free. I do read, write, and busy my hands at many crafts. I draw, sketch, paint, and create constructions. My most recent project of construction has already taken two years in it's making. A balsa wood sesquiplane is so light, merely two or so ounces in weight, and yet sturdy to stand up against my rough handling of it. What's more is the fact that the feather light park flyer is actually airworthy and stable enough for remote controls. I know there is a lot more to do with the sesquiplane before it is finished, but it is getting there, slowly.

20111119

19 November 2011

A typical November month is one of cold, snow storms, and winds that blow that coldness right through you. It is a wintry month that blusters the seasonal weather mercilessly against anyone or anything standing in the way. I remember many winters beginning with a set of storms that blanket snows over barren lands and leafless trees alike. This November month is an exception to the usual onset of winter. It has been brighter and warmer than usual, with a noticeable absence of cold and snow. Leaves on the trees had brightened into their autumn colours as usual and dropped slowly to the ground. Frost appeared during some nights, but the weather has been far warmer than usual. Even so, I have been lightly dressed and unprepared for real winter weather. I distinctly remember growing up and expecting to wear a snowsuit under all of the Halloween costumes I wore. And the years since then were all similar with the fall of snow coming on Halloween. So, it is an evident fact that the lack of snow has resulted from the warmer weather patterns of El Nina that have swept farther north. Who knows what sort of winter we will expect with the change of the usual weather patterns.

20111010

8 October 2011

I doubt that I would have anything important to say. I certainly am not pretty or young. And, I can't even dream of being a prolific artist of anything. One of the few things I seem to be consistently good at is to fall asleep in front of Super Stupid, and then burning the poor keyboard or myself with a lit cigarette. Smoking is such a habit I have trouble quitting. I can say with conviction that I am addicted to the three C's, namely cigarettes, coffee, and computers, not necessarily in that order. Oh well. Gifted means that long days of practice have been sweated out, insight enhanced with health and prosperity, and a sort of success at one thing or another. None of the above have crossed my path except for the sweat part. I do sweat in my daily hot baths to loosen up my muscles enough to straighten my bent spine by lessening the pain enough with the soothing heat. Having a disease certainly changes your life into something else that dehumanizes you in so many ways. Some of the medications I am on do have a way of opening up my thoughts in amazingly new ways. I was always so conventional, so black and white, and definitely paranoid with fear of some things. I couldn't be left alone, afraid of the closed in spaces, and especially the dark. It wasn't anything that people did to scare me, but the moments of facing the unknown, Laser lights do terrify me. So does the fear of falling. There is so much more to fear in my convoluted mind. For decades, I would wake up in the middle of the night screaming my lungs out and sweating buckets of wet sweat. My body smelled scummy in those times, without any known cause or cure. Just as suddenly as those bouts would start, they would run for weeks, and then stop. It drove my doctors and psychiatrists crazy to try to explain what happened to me or why I was reacting as I did. Whatever it was, it was as real as I could possibly verbalize. The only question was what was it. From my mid teens until my working career ended in 1999, I was super healthy and strong. I would walk into places where nobody dared to go themselves. Nothing people could do would scare me. But, where my fears began was far beyond normal. Most people would simply avoid me for all of the troubles I seemed to have following me. I was a fierce enough competitor that whatever scared me certainly put fear into the bravest of souls. I didn't go out in search of relationships. They certainly found me when I least expected. The four individuals I managed to settled down with were stable and strong in their own ways. Perhaps a decade would be enough for them to end the relationships for their own reasons. Then would come the time for me to mope and mourn in abject loneliness. I always hated being alone for any reason. I was more capable and gifted than anyone could imagine even when isolated. I could keep myself busy to pass the time away. And, I could find my way in and around most factories. I was a skilled assembler and machine operator for more than two decades before I began a career in professional driving. I never imagined myself in doing anything involving the complexities that went along with my jobs. There was a dumb and numb streak in me that came out as sheer stubbornness. If I was able to do something, I would be able to do that thing all day long. However, it became evident that I had trouble with physically repetitious movements. Assembly lines and dealing with numbers of people became increasingly difficult for me to manage successfully. It wasn't until I became an independent trucker that I was able to put my skillsets into a brilliantly shining career. I networked enough to learn what I had to expect in finding and delivering loads for a living. I travelled extensively throughout the continent in delivering freight and goods or haulage for hire. I discovered a freedom I hadn't known before, along with ominous responsibilities. Now I am just a broken down old fool with nothing of a future ahead of me. I still keep my fingers moving and my hands busy at different pasttimes. Afterall, my hands are literally factories that just haven't quit yet. I still tell stories and spin my wheels because there is always a need somewhere. Believe that I have earned my attitude and strange way of lilting my speech with too simple of a vocabulary. Uhuh.

20111005

4 October 2011

I doubt that I would have anything important to say. I certainly am not pretty or young. And, I can't even dream of being a prolific artist of anything. One of the few things I seem to be consistently good at is to fall asleep in front of Super Stupid, and then burning the poor keyboard or myself with a lit cigarette. Smoking is such a habit I have trouble quitting. I can say with conviction that I am addicted to the three C's, namely cigarettes, coffee, and computers, not necessarily in that order. Oh well. Gifted means that long days of practice have been sweated out, insight enhanced with health and prosperity, and a sort of success at one thing or another. None of the above have crossed my path except for the sweat part. I do sweat in my daily hot baths to loosen up my muscles enough to straighten my bent spine by lessening the pain enough with the soothing heat. Having a disease certainly changes your life into something else that dehumanizes you in so many ways. Some of the medications I am on do have a way of opening up my thoughts in amazingly new ways. I was always so conventional, so black and white, and definitely paranoid with fear of some things. I couldn't be left alone, afraid of the closed in spaces, and especially the dark. It wasn't anything that people did to scare me, but the moments of facing the unknown, Laser lights do terrify me. So does the fear of falling. There is so much more to fear in my convoluted mind. For decades, I would wake up in the middle of the night screaming my lungs out and sweating buckets of wet sweat. My body smelled scummy in those times, without any known cause or cure. Just as suddenly as those bouts would start, they would run for weeks, and then stop. It drove my doctors and psychiatrists crazy to try to explain what happened to me or why I was reacting as I did. Whatever it was, it was as real as I could possibly verbalize. The only question was what was it. From my mid teens until my mid thirties, I was a drunken doper hiding myself from reality as much as I could. A full decade after my first divorce was when I began trying to make sense of my fears. I started sketching and writing something of my fears and my history. I wasn't crazy or suicidal because of my fears simply because I did fear very plausible and real things. Whatever I did, couldn't scratch the surface of my dark and fearful nightmares. I knew that whatever it was, didn't matter to anyone else but me. I was in my late fifties when I finally began to settle down. My body became wasted away with a disease. I went from terrific health and strength to a mere 96 lb bag of bones that laid on a bed for four years. I couldn't go up or down a set of stairs to my rented room. I was in that room for over four years before I met someone who was willing to believe in me enough to have a relationship. My life was saved that completely. My sketching and writing returned to me with visions of a wonderfully beautiful world. My sickness abated and I gained weight. My body slowly recovered and my gifts of creativity were practiced dilligently. I made friends and kept myself out of trouble. I was able to shine as a friend and a cherished love to the one who saved me. I learned how to become happy, even with my limitations and weaknesses. I haven't got any world saving quips to say nor any advices to anyone. Each person has to live their own lives and make their own choices to fulfill their destiny and place in the world. No one can take responsibility for anyone else nor live out their lives for them. We are all individuals and unique in what we give to the world around us.

20110905

5 September 2011

5 September 2011 Oh, it looks like I only have an hour to spare this time. I don’t know exactly how long I do have, only that it is shorter than usual. We have to go somewhere on this Labour Day weekend. It is almost funny that a holiday doesn’t necessarily mean that you can take as long as you want in doing something. Hourray for the long weekend holiday that takes up three days instead of the regular two days. I have thought about time travel, and I even think that I have done something to that effect according to my indistinct memories. Let’s face it, a fifty year lapse has occurred since those events happened. And, there is just so much that has been forgotten along the way. All I care about is that the paradoxes were handled and that I am still alive for it. I have done all kinds of things in my life and it doesn’t seem to stop. I have a number of alterations done with my genetics as a result of one thing or another. I don’t know how many times I was collapsed on the ground or hung up in a tree. All I do know is that I have managed to get up and keep going. Ain’t that the way, eh? I do remember getting sick and spending four years on my bed. I couldn’t stand up straight or do stairs. I lived in a room on the second floor of a rental house, and I couldn’t do the stairs. I would crawl up or down those stairs with the help of someone, but never alone. I was terrified of falling, and I would have too. I spend a decade of weighing only 98 lbs of skin and bones. I kept waking up and that was as much a surprise as it was a disappointment to me. I would rather have stopped the pain and suffering I did endure. I couldn’t believe that my time was not at an end. Somehow I kept waking up and doing something. One thing after another was what kept me busy. There wasn’t much I could do, only that it was enough to keep me busy. It was enough to keep me going. Well, I am still going and it seems that there is less time for each day. Is that even possible when time shortens gradually without notice? I never thought that getting older was even a remote possibility. I was at the edge of doing things that were impossible. I was so healthy and strong that it would have scared you to just see me. I stayed hidden somehow and in some way for most of my life. It wasn’t easy for me to develop my conditioning and senses, but it was a necessity of survival. I was so fearful of something that I would freak at the motion of a shadow or a sudden, unexpected noise. I don’t know what it was, only that I was so afraid. I remember crying for most of my childhood for one reason or another. It was a fact that I was a sickly child, with rheumatic fever, chicken pops, mumps, colds, and allergies up the ying yang. It’s funny, but everything went by so fast. I would get so sick that I couldn’t believe I could live, but I did. I would seem to blink and I was on into something else. There was always something else. As an adult, I was always short of time that seemed to be getting shorter by minutes every day. I could never squeeze what I wanted out of time for a day’s worth of efforts. I keep repeating that Life is a balance, that what comes around is what goes around. It amazes me that the parable seems true, or is it? Does it really balance out in the end? Will I get some sort of reward for my efforts? I might not be so noble, but at least I do try to be as straight up and honest as I can manage under the circumstances. I do remember a lot of things that almost don’t make sense or even seem possible for anyone to do. There were times when I was on the spot, doing what had to be done. Someone had to do something and there was no one else around to do it for me. I had to do it right up until I got so sick that I couldn’t stand up straight. Now my bones are rotting away from the inside and I am turning into a blob of fat and muscle. That is something else that I didn’t know was possible, but only to me. If I had an hour to tell about me and what I would leave behind, what would I say? Who knows when they will suddenly take leave of this world? I never know when I will come to an end, even when I have fallen from heights, or had some sort of accident. A rope would break, a cable would snap, or something would happen to make it all come to a stop. But not for me. I would wake up and shake off the waves of hurt. Then one day it happened that there was something I couldn’t shake off. I got sick. Who would believe that I would be able to sit and think about my memories like a full time occupation of watching movies. my movies of my experiences. There are so many things to think about that I never get bored. I might get so tired that I have fallen asleep while doing things, walking, swimming, working, or anything repetitious. I do look for patterns in things when I bother to look. There are always patterns in everything that humanity does. We have learned that patterns are a part of our lives just as the very genetics that force us to grow in the ways that we do. There are patterns in everything that has genetics. It is a fact that genetics are patterns that evolve for one reason or another and we are set to live out our lives by the patterns we have had evolve for us. Right. There are patterns and there are pattern breakers. There are builders and destroyers. There are people who live peacefully and those who do not. I happen to be a mix of both that has come about to live out as I have done. I couldn’t have done any differently because that is the way it is. And, patterns don’t change until they are replaced with other patterns that do have changes in them already formed for size, weight, and all other relevant characteristics. Patterns again. I know I live according to patterns. I also know when to jump to avoid certain conditions or patterns from happening. You don’t walk on thin ice or sit in a bonfire. There are so many things you can do that it seems hardly worth the effort to think about what you can’t do. It is no wonder humanity would be considered a real nasty parasite to be eliminated. We are insatiable and so resilient in most conditions. We seem to survive almost anything once we use our brains to figure out what we do need. We use tools and our brains. But, that is where I can say that I am only a button pusher. I don’t have the technologies I once had and I can’t do what I used to do by myself. I need those technologies or I am no different than anyone else, except for the fact that I do know what to do at the right time. It’s funny to be able to say that when I can make some of the most hilarious mistakes just at the wrong time. It might not be anything to do with buttons or paradoxes, but it is still a serious thing to make mistakes in the first place. You might think that I would be smart enough to know when to cross the street. But, there have been times when I was totally unprepared for decision making or choices when those mistakes have happened to me. I can sit still and laugh at those circumstances in hindsight with much laughter. But, there have been times when I sweated blood to exert enough energy to do what had to be done. I was bruised all over for a long time afterwards. But, I did do what had to be done and that is what assures me that I did so do the right things and I am still alive for it. Survival is in our blood just as our genetics have made us to be. We can only follow the patterns that were made for us. I seem to think that at one point, I did make a few alterations to something that determined just how my own patterns would turn out to be. Maybe that is my reward for my own fate. Maybe that is just what was done at some point in time to ensure not only my own survival, but the continued survival of others as well. That’s something else to think about. I was never alone. I always had a team or a group to work with during my memories. I was never alone then and I still can’t bear being alone now. There is always someone within shouting range around me. Rarely is there ever a need to have someone come to my rescue, but they are always there and waiting to be needed, watching for a danger to be neutralized. I suppose that is only a part of a pattern, to be useful or used, as the case may be. We are always a part of something, a group or a team. We have to be pretty exceptional to get away from society in general. People are so insidious that they are always there, always playing out a part in something that eventually matters to something else. We pick up and repair patterns as we see fit to keep the balances that we live by. We do make our own world come about as we want it to be.

20110727

27 July 2011

The trouble with measurements comes along with degrees of interpretation depending upon whether the measures are in Imperial, Colonial, Standard, or Metric values. The difference of translating from one measure value to another measure value always means that there will be a discrepancy of some sort.

I was born and raised to learn the Imperial value of measures. Then, there was the conversion from Imperial standards to Metric standards of measure. I have had a hard time to judge weights and measures in my old fashioned way before converting it all to Metric standards.

Decades have passed with the country using Metric standards while I fumbled along using my judgement in Imperial measures before converting my guesses into Metric standard values. Not easy, not accurate, and certainly not reliable in any way for me to make such ill formed guessed judgements .

The preceeding information helps to understand the troubles I have with making measurements. When I measured the length of the graphlite rod that I would need to connect the elevator servo to the elevator control horn, I made a mistake. I measured the center of the servo travel length to the center of the elevator control horn. I failed to include the extra length of wire that would be needed to prevent mousing on the graphlite rod from dragging on the unmeasured half of the servo travel length. Oops!

I had been in the process of installing the completed graphlite and wire control rod to hook the servo to the elevator control horn. The simple fact is that I will have to shorten the length of the graphlite rod and increase the length of wire by the same amount. I will have to cut the graphlite rod on both ends, drill two holes and mouse wire onto both ends of the graphlite rod. I suppose it is a good thing to discover my mistake when I did. So, sit back and wait for the popcorn to be nuked while I play catchup to where I should be with the graphlite carbon rods and moused wire ends. Right.

It has taken the better part of the evening to break, hack, and wiggle the newly made graphlite control rod with moused wire ends into place within the balsa wood fuselage of the Fokker DVII sesquiplane. I can’t believe how hard it was to get that little task done! The fact that I was actually able to get the graphlite control rod into the fuselage was more by someone else’s design and not my own efforts. It is obvious that the glider aspect of the sesquiplane was so well designed by an experienced builder. I am grateful for that little extra allowance here and there throughout the fuselage design to make little changes needed to convert the glider into a reasonable remote control park flyer.

There are troubles that can be solved and other troubles that are just there and must be surmounted. The wire must be bent to right angles while sitting in a tiny hole on a nylon plastic tab of the servo for the elevator. The trouble is that there is so much stress exerted against the sides of the hole while the wire is bent. I have been lucky to avoid damages to the nylon plastic tab. Were that little nylon plastic tab to become damaged, the whole circuitboard worth about $80.00 would have to be replaced. Sometimes there are little things that have great importance, eh?

It is a ticklish business to fit the graphlite carbon rod and wire ends into position within the fuselage. The bending of the wire ends is made even more difficult with the possibility of breaking off the nylon plastic tabs on the servos. I would do my best to bend the wire carefully and hope that the little nylon plastic tabs would hold up under the stress. So far I have not broken any of the little white nylon plastic tabs.

I admit that I am worried about what I do while positioning the graphlite carbon rods with the wire ends. I have had to cut out some of the fuselage struts to fit the long rods into place. I have had to replace the wire ends because of their being too short, and of their breaking off under metal fatigue. Now I have the practice of drilling holes and bending wire pieces to be moused. The important thing is that I can do the work efficiently and quickly to the exact lengths that are needed.

I spent three days at the task of fitting in the first two graphlite carbon rods. One mistake after another caused me to repeat the work until I got it right. Each time I did the work, I learned more about how and why the graphlite carbon rods with wire ends were chosen for the type of control rods. There is a composite of maximum strength with a minimum of flexing during the push or pulling actions carried out by the control rods. Finally I became so fatigued and stressed out by my mistakes that I had to rest for a day.

Taking a rest when you are tired is a good thing. It relieves stress and freshens up the body when nutrients are low. A steady habit of resting can go a long way to preventing burnout. When I did go back to working on the balsa wood project, I immediately saw a few mistakes that I hadn’t noticed before. The left elevator had two breaks in the balsa wood frame. The fuselage had breaks in several side struts. And, there were poorly done bends in the wire ends of the control rods.

It is usually easy to correct most mistakes. Unfortunately, I had either the wrong type of tools or I was going about the repairs in the wrong way. I couldn’t make right angle bends in the wire ends of the control rods. I do think that either I need new tools to work with or I need to ask someone for help with the bending of the wire. It isn't up to me to be able to do all of the work that a factory can do, but it is up to me to do my best in making a balsa wood scale model Fokker DVII sesquiplane that is capable of remote control flying. Right.

There is a certain art to bending wire. It takes a bit of practice to get it just right. I fought with half a dozen wire ends of the control rods before I felt a certain feeling when bending the wire to the exact length I needed to connect the servo tabs with the control horns. It was a literal test of my hand strength for every wire ending of the graphlite control rods. And I knew my hands had been tested by their aching fatigue. I kept with the task at hand, and by hand, I was able to accomplish the sort of neat and tidy work I would be proud of afterwards.

It was the last control rod that I had to make for the remote controls of the balsa wood sesquiplane. I aced the work of mousing the wire pieces I pushed through the tiny holes I drilled in the third graphlite rod. I felt exhilarated at the job I did of bending the one wire end just so it would fit easily into the servo tab. I happily fit the wire end into the hole of the nylon plastic tab of the servo. I followed the length of the graphlite control rod back to the elevator control horn. To my shock, the wire ended at exactly the point where it should bend into the hold of the control horn.

I have cut wire moused and glued onto the graphlite control rods before. It means that I will have one more length of wire to cut and replace a bent wire already moused and glued onto a graphlite control rod. I know I am too familiar with going over work I have already done to correct a thoughtless or misguided mistake. One more such mistake is not outside of my realm of experience.

The second attempt at mousing a wire end onto a graphlite carbon rod went quickly enough. I was happy with the work, especially when the wire bent as I wanted it to do. I still have to cut through the fuselage side to allow for the passage of the graphlite carbon control rod. I will have to strengthen the fuselage sides and make proper guide holes for the control rods to go through.

The tedious part of crafting the graphlite carbon control rods and setting them up is done. I have a minor task of putting in some new struts into the sides of the fuselage. One elevator is still in dire need of repair and the other has a bit of overhanging hinge. I can trim off a bit of the base for the control horn that sticks out too far.

It is surprising how much time can pass by without notice while tinkering away at little odds and ends. I have spent over six hours at finishing the graphlite carbon control rods and hooking them up correctly. It actually doesn’t take much to put the length of the control rods out enough to affect the angles of the elevators and rudder. The actual test will be when the electronics are adjusted to move the servos. Hm.

Wire can conduct electricity, join, or tie things together, and have many other uses, However malleable wire might be, it is a metal that can be bent only so many times before it breaks. Each bend in a wire causes stresses and crystallization that leads to failure of the metallic strength. My inexperience with wire caused me to bend the wire ends of the graphlite carbon control rods repeatedly until breakage occurred. So far, I have had to replace three wire ends of the graphlite carbon control rods.

It is easier than I first thought to cut off and replace wire ends of the graphlite carbon control rods. I had to conquer my ominous feeling of dread before I could begin the actual work of replacing each wire end. Once I actually started, it didn’t prove to be as difficult as I had imagined. I was able to get the practice I needed to work with the wire ends. It does make a lot of difference when you know what you are doing and have the practice you need to work successfully through a particularly difficult task.

It can easily become frustrating when something doesn’t go quite right. When such situations arise, it is wise to take a break or examine the tools and the task for the cause of the difficulty. There are many ways to do the same task and the one way that gets done is not always the best way. Check and recheck the work to see that nothing is left out or that might be straying out of alignment. Work habits are evolved with continuous practice of conscientious awareness and sure movements in a safe and serious manner.

20110725

25 July 2011

Today is the day after I successfully completed the making of a control rod for the rudder. 0f the three control rods to be made, it is the shortest and the first after which all the rest will follow. I am pleased with the method I used to create the control rod that took a total of three days to complete. And, I had to purchase more tools and supplies to complete the job.

The first purchase I had to make was of a .040 gauge wire. Luckily for me the wire came in single three foot lengths and cost only sixty eight cents. I took the newly purchased wire home to begin work on the first control rod. The first thing I did was to file a flat spot on the graphlite rod I had measured and cut to length. Then I had a flat spot to center the drill and begin to drill the hole through the graphlite rod. A two inch piece of wire was cut and bent with the first of four bends. The wire fit neatly into the hole in the graphlite rod and the second of the four bends was made. Mousing with glue completed the affixing of the bent wire to the graphlite rod.

It was only after completing the fashioning of the control rod that I found the wire was twice the diameter of the holes available on the servo. I had to cut off the affixed wire on the graphlite rod. A bit of cleaning up was needed to prepare the graphlite rod for the second hole to be drilled for the first piece of smaller wire. The way was prepared for some shopping to be done.

The trip to the hobby store was business like and brief. I knew where the selections of supplies were and went directly to the section with wire and material supplies. I selected a piece of .020 gauge wire for sixty eight cents. A loonie produced some extra change for me to feed into my purse. My purse is usually heavy enough for me to pronounce that it carries two extra bricks instead of the regular one brick.

A second stop was made at Lee Valley. Not one but two jeweler’s vices were purchased. Now I have a total of three jeweler’s vices I had found that my hand drill did not handle the wire sizes of drills. However, the jeweler’s vice could fit the wire sized drills quite nicely. And, the jeweler’s vice was also able to handle the gauge of the graphlite rod and so give support for filing and drilling that needed to be done.

A third stop at another store was to purchase a tiny four inch desk vice that could easily clamp temporarily onto my desktop. A tiny vice would make bending of any material or just holding it into place to be worked on in a quick and easy manner. I have often thought of acquiring a desktop vice, but had put it off until now. I hate to think of my growing list of tiny tools intended just for my delightful hobby of scale modelling.

The acquisition of a desktop vice was more than I had expected. The four inch vice is actually an all-purpose piece of equipment that does clamp onto any desktop quite easily. The vice also has a small oval shaped flat surface anvil for working and finishing materials. It is a well designed and sturdy vice for most purposes I might have in mind. The desktop vice came along with the purchase of a small flat file. It was a bit of a splurge on my part, but I thought it was a good opportunity to make the best of the visit to that speciality store.

The trouble with measurements comes along with degrees of interpretation depending upon whether the measures are in Imperial, Colonial, Standard, or Metric values. The difference of translating from one measure value to another measure value always means that there will be a discrepancy of some sort.

I was born and raised to learn the Imperial value of measures. Then, there was the conversion from Imperial standards to Metric standards of measure. I have had a hard time to judge weights and measures in my old fashioned way before converting it all to Metric standards.

Decades have passed with the country using Metric standards while I fumbled along using my judgement in Imperial measures before converting my guesses into Metric standard values. Not easy, not accurate, and certainly not reliable in any way for me to make such ill formed guessed judgements .

The preceeding information helps to understand the troubles I have with making measurements. When I measured the length of the graphlite rod that I would need to connect the elevator servo to the elevator control horn, I made a mistake. I measured the center of the servo travel length to the center of the elevator control horn. I failed to include the extra length of wire that would be needed to prevent mousing on the graphlite rod from dragging on the unmeasured half of the servo travel length. Oops!

I had been in the process of installing the completed graphlite and wire control rod to hook the servo to the elevator control horn. The simple fact is that I will have to shorten the length of the graphlite rod and increase the length of wire by the same amount. I will have to cut the graphlite rod on both ends, drill two holes and mouse wire onto both ends of the graphlite rod. I suppose it is a good thing to discover my mistake when I did. So, sit back and wait for the popcorn to be nuked while I play catchup to where I should be with the graphlite carbon rods and moused wire ends. Right.

It has taken the better part of the evening to break, hack, and wiggle the newly made graphlite control rod with moused wire ends into place within the balsa wood fuselage of the Fokker DVII sesquiplane. I can’t believe how hard it was to get that little task done! The fact that I was actually able to get the graphlite control rod into the fuselage was more by someone else’s design and not my own efforts. It is obvious that the glider aspect of the sesquiplane was so well designed by an experienced builder. I am grateful for that little extra allowance here and there throughout the fuselage design to make little changes needed to convert the glider into a reasonable remote control park flyer.

There are troubles that can be solved and other troubles that are just there and must be surmounted. The wire must be bent to right angles while sitting in a tiny hole on a nylon plastic tab of the servo for the elevator. The trouble is that there is so much stress exerted against the sides of the hole while the wire is bent. I have been lucky to avoid damages to the nylon plastic tab. Were that little nylon plastic tab to become damaged, the whole circuitboard worth about $80.00 would have to be replaced. Sometimes there are little things that have great importance, eh?

It is a ticklish business to fit the graphlite carbon rod and wire ends into position within the fuselage. The bending of the wire ends is made even more difficult with the possibility of breaking off the nylon plastic tabs on the servos. I would do my best to bend the wire carefully and hope that the little nylon plastic tabs would hold up under the stress. So far I have not broken any of the little white nylon plastic tabs.

I admit that I am worried about what I do while positioning the graphlite carbon rods with the wire ends. I have had to cut out some of the fuselage struts to fit the long rods into place. I have had to replace the wire ends because of their being too short, and of their breaking off under metal fatigue. Now I have the practice of drilling holes and bending wire pieces to be moused. The important thing is that I can do the work efficiently and quickly to the exact lengths that are needed.

I spent three days at the task of fitting in the first two graphlite carbon rods. One mistake after another caused me to repeat the work until I got it right. Each time I did the work, I learned more about how and why the graphlite carbon rods with wire ends were chosen for the type of control rods. There is a composite of maximum strength with a minimum of flexing during the push or pulling actions carried out by the control rods. Finally I became so fatigued and stressed out by my mistakes that I had to rest for a day.

Taking a rest when you are tired is a good thing. It relieves stress and freshens up the body when nutrients are low. A steady habit of resting can go a long way to preventing burnout. When I did go back to working on the balsa wood project, I immediately saw a few mistakes that I hadn’t noticed before. The left elevator had two breaks in the balsa wood frame. The fuselage had breaks in several side struts. And, there were poorly done bends in the wire ends of the control rods.

It is usually easy to correct most mistakes. Unfortunately, I had either the wrong type of tools or I was going about the repairs in the wrong way. I couldn’t make right angle bends in the wire ends of the control rods. I do think that either I need new tools to work with or I need to ask someone for help with the bending of the wire. It isn't up to me to be able to do all of the work that a factory can do, but it is up to me to do my best in making a balsa wood scale model Fokker DVII sesquiplane that is capable of remote control flying. Right.

There is a certain art to bending wire. It takes a bit of practice to get it just right. I fought with half a dozen wire ends of the control rods before I felt a certain feeling when bending the wire to the exact length I needed to connect the servo tabs with the control horns. It was a literal test of my hand strength for every wire ending of the graphlite control rods. And I knew my hands had been tested by their aching fatigue. I kept with the task at hand, and by hand, I was able to accomplish the sort of neat and tidy work I would be proud of afterwards.

It was the last control rod that I had to make for the remote controls of the balsa wood sesquiplane. I aced the work of mousing the wire pieces I pushed through the tiny holes I drilled in the third graphlite rod. I felt exhilarated at the job I did of bending the one wire end just so it would fit easily into the servo tab. I happily fit the wire end into the hole of the nylon plastic tab of the servo. I followed the length of the graphlite control rod back to the elevator control horn. To my shock, the wire ended at exactly the point where it should bend into the hold of the control horn.

I have cut wire moused and glued onto the graphlite control rods before. It means that I will have one more length of wire to cut and replace a bent wire already moused and glued onto a graphlite control rod. I know I am too familiar with going over work I have already done to correct a thoughtless or misguided mistake. One more such mistake is not outside of my realm of experience.

The second attempt at mousing a wire end onto a graphlite carbon rod went quickly enough. I was happy with the work, especially when the wire bent as I wanted it to do. I still have to cut through the fuselage side to allow for the passage of the graphlite carbon control rod. I will have to strengthen the fuselage sides and make proper guide holes for the control rods to go through.

The tedious part of crafting the graphlite carbon control rods and setting them up is done. I have a minor task of putting in some new struts into the sides of the fuselage. One elevator is still in dire need of repair and the other has a bit of overhanging hinge. I can trim off a bit of the base for the control horn that sticks out too far.

It is surprising how much time can pass by without notice while tinkering away at little odds and ends. I have spent over six hours at finishing the graphlite carbon control rods and hooking them up correctly. It actually doesn’t take much to put the length of the control rods out enough to affect the angles of the elevators and rudder. The actual test will be when the electronics are adjusted to move the servos. Hm.

CJ; vb

20110718

17 July 2011b

The trouble with measurements comes along with degrees of interpretation depending upon whether the measures are in Imperial, Colonial, Standard, or Metric values. The difference of translating from one measure value to another measure value always means that there will be a discrepancy of some sort.

I was born and raised to learn the Imperial value of measures. Then, there was the conversion from Imperial standards to Metric standards of measure. I have had a hard time to judge weights and measures in my old fashioned way before converting it all to Metric standards.

Decades have passed with the country using Metric standards while I fumbled along using my judgement in Imperial measures before converting my guesses into Metric standard values. Not easy, not accurate, and certainly not reliable in any way for me to make such ill formed guessed judgements .

The preceeding information helps to understand the troubles I have with making measurements. When I measured the length of the graphlite rod that I would need to connect the elevator servo to the elevator control horn, I made a mistake. I measured the center of the servo travel length to the center of the elevator control horn. I failed to include the extra length of wire that would be needed to prevent mousing on the graphlite rod from dragging on the unmeasured half of the servo travel length. Oops!

I had been in the process of installing the completed graphlite and wire control rod to hook the servo to the elevator control horn. The simple fact is that I will have to shorten the length of the graphlite rod and increase the length of wire by the same amount. I will have to cut the graphlite rod on both ends, drill two holes and mouse wire onto both ends of the graphlite rod. I suppose it is a good thing to discover my mistake when I did. So, sit back and wait for the popcorn to be nuked while I play catchup to where I should be with the graphlite carbon rods and moused wire ends. Right.

It has taken the better part of the evening to break, hack, and wiggle the newly made graphlite control rod with moused wire ends into place within the balsa wood fuselage of the Fokker DVII sesquiplane. I can’t believe how hard it was to get that little task done! The fact that I was actually able to get the graphlite control rod into the fuselage was more by someone else’s design and not my own efforts. It is obvious that the glider aspect of the sesquiplane was so well designed by an experienced builder. I am grateful for that little extra allowance here and there throughout the fuselage design to make little changes needed to convert the glider into a reasonable remote control park flyer.

20110717

17 July 2011

Today is the day after I successfully completed the making of a control rod for the rudder. 0f the three control rods to be made, it is the shortest and the first after which all the rest will follow. I am pleased with the method I used to create the control rod that took a total of three days to complete. And, I had to purchase more tools and supplies to complete the job.

The first purchase I had to make was of a .040 gauge wire. Luckily for me the wire came in single three foot lengths and cost only sixty eight cents. I took the newly purchased wire home to begin work on the first control rod. The first thing I did was to file a flat spot on the graphlite rod I had measured and cut to length. Then I had a flat spot to center the drill and begin to drill the hole through the graphlite rod. A two inch piece of wire was cut and bent with the first of four bends. The wire fit neatly into the hole in the graphlite rod and the second of the four bends was made. Mousing with glue completed the affixing of the bent wire to the graphlite rod.

It was only after completing the fashioning of the control rod that I found the wire was twice the diameter of the holes available on the servo. I had to cut off the affixed wire on the graphlite rod. A bit of cleaning up was needed to prepare the graphlite rod for the second hole to be drilled for the first piece of smaller wire. The way was prepared for some shopping to be done.

The trip to the hobby store was business like and brief. I knew where the selections of supplies were and went directly to the section with wire and material supplies. I selected a piece of .020 gauge wire for sixty eight cents. A loonie produced some extra change for me to feed into my purse. My purse is usually heavy enough for me to pronounce that it carries two extra bricks instead of the regular one brick.

A second stop was made at Lee Valley. Not one but two jeweler’s vices were purchased. Now I have a total of three jeweler’s vices I had found that my hand drill did not handle the wire sizes of drills. However, the jeweler’s vice could fit the wire sized drills quite nicely. And, the jeweler’s vice was also able to handle the gauge of the graphlite rod and so give support for filing and drilling that needed to be done.

A third stop at another store was to purchase a tiny four inch desk vice that could easily clamp temporarily onto my desktop. A tiny vice would make bending of any material or just holding it into place to be worked on in a quick and easy manner. I have often thought of acquiring a desktop vice, but had put it off until now. I hate to think of my growing list of tiny tools intended just for my delightful hobby of scale modelling.

The acquisition of a desktop vice was more than I had expected. The four inch vice is actually an all-purpose piece of equipment that does clamp onto any desktop quite easily. The vice also has a small oval shaped flat surface anvil for working and finishing materials. It is a well designed and sturdy vice for most purposes I might have in mind. The desktop vice came along with the purchase of a small flat file. It was a bit of a splurge on my part, but I thought it was a good opportunity to make the best of the visit to that speciality store.

20110704

4 July 2011

Happy 4th to America! Canadians have their own thing to worry about and celebrate theirs on the first day of July. How about that!

We took three days to go on a visit to our daughter in Toronto. She is having another bout of hypochondriac paranoia that only parents can resolve. We are trying to fix things in our own way. It isn't entirely professional to use home cures, but sometimes it just works anyways. Our trip was an overall success and we enjoyed ourselves at everything. Our van ran well as did my electric wheelchair. There were no complaints including the overnight thunderstorm that went through the Toronto area to freshen and wash the landscape as well as it did.

All of this travelling around only means that I have direly neglected to work on the bare frame of balsa wood that now has an outrunner motor and an activator servo installed. The frame does need some foreward balancing to level out the static balance of the sesquiplane. I will try to install the circuitboard and electric battery as far foreward as possible to make up what is needed for the static balance of the airframe. I am happy about how things are proceeding, although it is tediously slow and full of many little sudden inspirations. It certainly isn't the factory way of doing things. Oh well, as it proceeds, eh?

20110620

19 June 2011

Today was when we went to some friend’s place to rescue by way of a visit. We belong to a social club that boasts thirty or forty members. We are active volunteers for various events and we enjoy what we do. Our participation is because we know what we can do to help the group without spreading our own resources too thin. Afterall, we aren’t rich by any stretch of the imagination. A procrastinator send out a message of distress concerning the general state of their home. A whole lot of stuff was piled up in every corner of every available space in what amounted to be a two bedroom apartment. Two grown adults and a five year old boy lived in the constantly growing confusion and mess. Thankfully there was no garbage in the hoarding that was going on because it was all good stuff, just ever so inappropriately stored. I can understand what was happening to very bright and sensitive people that were trapped within a bubble of procrastination. Popping the bubble was not going to be easy for fear of hurting the feelings of our dear well intentioned procrastinating friends. At the same time it was necessary to set an example of how things should be instead of how things were in that closed in apartment. I spent the afternoon in the actively interactive building of a Spiderman set by Lego. The dear little five year old was quick to catch on reading the picture detailed instructions. Putting the puzzle of Lego pieces together was made more interesting by the playing with action figures according to the active imagination of the five year old who had not seen the movies about Spiderman. It was a lesson about the inventiveness of the five year old’s mind to fill in the space of ignorance that concerned the actions of the action figures in the Spiderman set. Keeping a hyperactive child occupied while the adults made a dent in the storage hoard was my contribution to the afternoon’s accomplishments. I had no idea of how or what was the work involved, only that it was done. Several large garbage bags of clothes were piled up to be donated to charity. About half of an apartment bedroom was cleared by the four adults as a result of the afternoon’s work. In retrospect, I can understand how the situation came to be as badly depressing as it was to the inhabitants. We are complex individuals that carry around a whole lot of baggage with us where we go. We don’t often reference what that baggage is but we do blindly hoard the treasures of the past as if they were more precious than gold. We don’t need useless boxes of clothes, Tupperware, and treasures of so long ago. Those reminders of the phantom past are as binding and valuable as they ever were while occupying space and time that would be better served in the present. Procrastination is a big word that doesn’t mean being lazy. Instead, it is a mere hanging on of the past over the more appropriate reality of the present. It takes a special care by concerned friends to solve the dilemmas represented by each item of the piled up hoard. We were the lucky ones to be able to help in the reordering of the storage pile that filled that bedroom at the end of the apartment’s main hall. You can believe I was tired and hungry by the time we were able to get back home. We dropped off the bags of clothes at the local charity and did a small shopping trip. I was able to get some toast and a cup of hot coffee for myself at home. It was refreshing to be home with the two big cats prowling around for attention.

20110608

8 June 2011

It is a slow process to think out where the remote control equipment will be mounted within the fuselage. The limit of balance is a hard factor to deal with in keeping the warbird in a straight and true flight. Yet, it is a necessity to stick to the plan and carry out the construction accordingly. It isn't such an impossible task to carry out the detailing of everything according to scale and the original design. A bit of extra effort and time won't make any difference if the results show the intended realism and thrilling view any spectator would expect.

I have put the outrunner motor into place behind the nose mask. I made the propeller shaft just the right length from two separate propeller cone mounts. I made a notch in each end of the propeller shaft to be joined. And, I added a core filler wire the same length as the combined propeller shaft. There should be balance and strength enough for the propeller shaft to stay joined together.

I was pleased with the work I did to mount the outrunner motor into the nose of the fuselage. I did use a glob of glue to hold the outrunner motor in place while I fiddled with the propeller shaft. I am glad I did glue the outrunner motor in place because I did notch the propeller shaft to the exact length needed for clearance of the propeller. After notching the propeller shaft it was only a matter of pulling out the outrunner motor.

Something I have been meaning to do for a while now, is to spray a dusting of verathane or wood protector over the entire structure of fuselage and wings of the Fokker DVII sesquiplane. This is something I have done to all of my balsa wood projects. I have the satisfaction of knowing that the balsa wood is waterproof and sealed with an effective preservative. Who knows how long those individual treasures will last providing they aren't demolished by whatever misfortune. My brother took pleasure in smashing a few boxes of my art and stuff after I left home in 1968. You know how little brothers are at times, eh?

Instead of doing all of this thinking that I have been doing lately, I should be busy with the control horns on the elevators and rudder. Or, I could be setting up the control rods to be mounted and anchored into place. One of the later things I will be doing is to mouse the lengths of wire at the ends of the control rods. But, I can't be sure of the exact control rod length until I have mounted in the circuitboard with the little actuators.

One item that has taken my fancy and thinking is to add a third actuator. If I had two actuators for the elevators and a separate third actuator for the rudder, I would have the finesse of flight control. It would make for a more complex mastery of that handheld remote control transmitter. The black and white of flight control would become the grey way of banking turns and fancy wingovers on demand. I would love to be able to do that, for sure!

20110516

14 May 2011

Today was another day of acquisitions by purchases. I bought another thirty dollars worth of materials at the Great Hobby store. I wasn't happy about spending more money on items for the sesquiplane. But, it seemed the wisest of things to do the simplest solution available to get past the obstacle of mounting the outrunner motor into the nose of the balsa wood fuselage.

I spent a few hours playing with the newly acquired pieces to see how best to fit them together. The battery pack and the addition of nose pieces together can’t weigh more than a few grams. It’s more weight than I would care to add, but it is sort of a short cut necessity. Somehow I will have to make a solid support in the nose that will have as little friction as possible in securing the propeller and propeller shaft.

I am having a terrible time in concentrating my mind on the topic of learning how to fly. There is a steep learning curve in learning how to use the computer capabilities of the remote control transmitter. Once it is programmed, the transmitter is capable of doing a number of programmed tasks. Operating the ailerons, elevators, rudder, and trim tabs become a matter of activating switches and stick controls of the complex six channels of the capable transmitter.

The biological mind is a far more complex type of computer than the remote control transmitter. Programming a mind is not the same as programming a remote control transmitter. I will have to learn how to operate the switches and controls of the remote control transmitter in order to be able to fly the Fokker DVII sesquiplane. I do want to see the balsa wood sesquiplane doing a low altitude flyby as I have imagined it. One of these days, possibly by the end of this year, it just might be able to happen. I would like to see that happen so much.

Already I can see a trouble looming up with the Fokker DVII styled nose. There is far too much material thickness to go through with the already lengthened propeller shaft. The added length of the propeller shaft will likely have some sort of bend enough to change the alignment and balance of the propeller shaft. I will have to be extra careful in how I join the separate pieces of the propeller shaft.

I have loaded the complete setup of remote control equipment into the fuselage. It is merely resting in about the place where the final installation would be. There isn’t much difference in the overall weight of the bare balsa wood frame of the fuselage and wings of the Fokker DVII. Now it is a matter of going through each step of making a permanent place for each component.

The nose of the fuselage is like a hollow mask. The nose mask fits snugly into the front of the fuselage. Initially, the nose mask was far too thick and heavy. I started carving out the nose piece until it was less than a quarter of its original weight. Hollowing out the nose piece does make it lighter, at the cost of strength. Hollowing out the nose piece also makes room for the placement of the electric motor that must fit in somehow. I have yet to design the placement of the little electric outrunner motor.
I have trimmed balsa wood from the nose piece. Now it is a matter of drilling a hole for the propeller shaft to fit through the thickness of the nose piece. The hole must be aligned with the propeller shaft and strengthened with plastic or nylon to reduce friction. I do have a drill of the right size for the thickness of the propeller shaft hole, Aligning the hole is necessary to support the outrunner motor. Right.

The drilling of the hole for the propeller shaft went well enough. I found that the motor was almost a good fit between the nose piece and the front of the fuselage, I tried to make the fit as close as possible, but the motor width was too large for the space that existed within the nose piece. I will have to cut into the fuselage about a quarter of an inch for the allowance needed by the motor. Meanwhile, the right side wheel fell off. Okay, it’s bath time.

There is always something better to do when the going gets tough. I had a tough going and now I can see with a different attitude. It does make a difference to take a rest once in a while just to keep your thoughts in line with what you are doing. It is far too easy to think about other things while you are working on something small. Then, it becomes magnified by the number of breakages that happen. Resting your eyes and fingers can save a whole lot of unnecessary repair work.

20110508

8 May 2011 Mother's Day

Arise, then, women of this day!
Arise all women who have hearts,
Whether your baptism be that of water or of tears
Say firmly:
"We will not have great questions decided by irrelevant agencies,
Our husbands shall not come to us reeking of carnage,
For caresses and applause.
Our sons shall not be taken from us to unlearn
All that we have been able to teach them of
charity, mercy and patience.

"We women of one country
Will be too tender of those of another country
To allow our sons to be trained to injure theirs."

From the bosom of the devastated earth a voice goes up with
Our own. It says, "Disarm, Disarm!"
The sword of murder is not the balance of justice!
Blood does not wipe out dishonor
Nor violence indicate possession.
As men have of ten forsaken the plow and the anvil at the summons of war.

Let women now leave all that may be left of home
For a great and earnest day of counsel.

Let them meet first, as women, to bewail and commemorate the dead.

Let them then solemnly take counsel with each other as to the means
Whereby the great human family can live in peace,
Each bearing after his own time the sacred impress, not of Caesar,
But of God.

In the name of womanhood and humanity, I earnestly ask
That a general congress of women without limit of nationality
May be appointed and held at some place deemed most convenient
And at the earliest period consistent with its objects
To promote the alliance of the different nationalities,
The amicable settlement of international questions.
The great and general interests of peace

Julia Howe

http://www.docudharma.com/diaries.do

7 May 2011

The work on my balsa wood project proceeds in fits and spurts. I can’t seem to hold a steady pace with anything. One day I can accomplish a whole lot of engineering and construction while the next day is a complete loss. Then I might work for a day and the rest of the week is wasted without a thought of doing anything. In actual fact, the only real work I seem to be able to get done is to build an imaginary farm called Farmville.

One day I was brilliant enough to take my Fokker DVII down to the hobby shop and say, “Here is what I am doing. What do I need to get this project flying as I intended it to do?”

The next hour was crammed with a crash course in putting together a remote control system that I would need for the size and weight of the Fokker DVII. The complexity of the remote control equipment was explained to me and simplified with examples of prebuilt kits. I was thankful for the education I received from the store representative.

It helped me to break down the entire remote control system into four basic areas of concern. The first concern is the type and size of an electric motor to power the craft in flight. The second area of concern is the circuit board mounted with the motor speed controller, the radio receiver, and the dual actuators that would move the elevators and rudder. The third area concerns the control rods that would connect the remote control actuators to the elevators and rudder. The fourth areas of concern are the elevators and rudder.

Simplifying something that is complex doesn’t always make it any easier to manage. The remote control system is only a fraction of the entire engineering project that amounts to the overall redesigned capabilities of the rubber band powered glider turned into a remote controlled electric motor powered flying sesquiplane. As wonderful as it seems in presentation, the project of the Fokker DVII isn’t entirely complete nor finished. I do have a considerable amount of work yet to do before that first flight could ever happen.

I had started off with a twelve dollar kit of balsa wood that would enable me to build a rubber band powered sesquiplane. The design of the balsa wood glider was such that it would fly an amazing distance in a level and straight flight. The balance and flying characteristics were a part of the design of the sesquiplane. I merely wanted to take the same design of sesquiplane and add remote control equipment. I didn’t think of the actual engineering that would be needed to equip the sesquiplane with the necessary control and power to fly successfully. Right.

The twelve dollar balsa wood sesquiplane suddenly took on a rapidly accruing expense. The interior of the fuselage would take on an electric motor and circuit board with a motor speed controller, a radio receiver, and two actuators for a total price of about one hundred and ten dollars. Then add the cost of control rods and control horns for about six dollars. The real expense is in the remote control radio transmitter control for about one hundred and seventy dollars. I know that there is the added expense of batteries, battery charger, and plug adapters. I know I am missing things that are yet to be added to the growing equipment and toolbox lists.
Summary of parts and purchases 12 April 2011

EFLUM180BL BL180 Brushless motor 2300kv 36.99
SPMR6610 DX6i DSMX 6 channel transmitter 159.99
SPMAR6400B AR6400 w/Lin Sx/BL KSC/x-port 69.99
DUB107 Control Horns - 1/2A (2) 2.38
CSTT3234 Carbon Micro Rod .080 x 4' 5.29

total cost 274.64


I thought to add my lists of purchases to ease the way for anyone who might want to adapt their own balsa wood rubber band powered aircraft to become a remote control micro park flyer. Besides, you never know whether I might need that information for future reference. Having built the remote control flying sesquiplane, I should be able to rebuild or repair my way past any inevitable or unforseen damages.

I admit that I have a number of mental and physical limitations that hinder whatever accomplishments accruing as a result of my life efforts. My actual capabilities underlie my efforts of meeting the challenges I face in this and other balsa wood projects I might attempt. Perhaps I might not be able to exhibit any standard of capabilities at any given time. However, I do show a certain shine when I rise to meet my own expectations.

There are degrees of difficulty in respect to attempting any balsa wood projects with or without blueprint plans and other instructions. Originally there was a balsa wood kit with a set of blueprint plans to follow in constructing the first Fokker DVII sesquiplane replica to be a rubber band powered glider. My concept of adapting a balsa wood glider to become a remote control flyer does involve a certain level of expertise in building and engineering.
Planning is an important aspect of constructing with balsa wood. Joints and structural shaping are both important to the overall appearance and sturdiness of the results. Filing and sanding will add finished features to the outer surfaces. A final covering of doped rice paper and painted details will complete the sesquiplane. It has always amazed me that the very light and seemingly fragile balsa wood structure would be so incredibly strengthened by the addition of doped rice paper.

It was my plan to build the balsa wood sesquiplane according to the blueprint plans before adding the extra weight of radio control equipment. I know how critical it is to keep everything as balanced as possible. The only way to ensure that is to follow the plans as closely as possible before making any changes. That way, the planned center of gravity for the sesquiplane would be very close to the theoretical balance point.

The actual balance point would change for the addition of each radio control component. The radio control components would have to be placed to keep the center of gravity a close as possible to the theoretical balance point. In turn, the placement of the radio control components would determine the lengths for the control rods to activate the elevators and rudder. Adjustments would have to be made to compensate for the weight of the control rods depending upon their lengths. Each aspect or stage of construction would have some influence upon the balance and center point of gravity.

I have already discovered that there are a few factors to control the aerodynamics of the balsa wood sesquiplane. Aerodynamics can compensate or overcome displacements in the center of gravity. The tilt or dihedral of the wings will have an airfoil effect to increase or decrease the direction and lift capability of the sesquiplane. There is also the presence of a small wing between the wheels of the sesquiplane. That wing can be used as a fine adjustment for the actual flight of the sesquiplane. Something else that could affect the flight of the sesquiplane is the addition of small tabs on the elevators and rudder.

The overall shape of the sesquiplane will have a considerable effect upon its flight path. The factors of wings and things will also have an effect. Something to be considered is the actual center line of the propeller in determining the overall lift of the sesquiplane in flight. Hopefully the fact of sticking to the blueprint plans will average out the many factors that are an influence in the flight of the sesquiplane.


20110504

4 May 2011

Here it is at the end of the day and I am in such a rush to get out a few words about this and that. The first thing is that I have had the second eye surgery to correct the cataracts that I have developed after years of bright sunshine and other abuses. We do have to be careful about our bodes and the parts thereof. Right.

The hobby store had called to let me know that some of the things I had ordered were in stock. I couldn't go right away, as much as I wanted to, until the money I usually receive was deposited into the bank. It doesn't do well when you try to melt the plastic of a debit card by any sort of tricks.

I entered the hobby shop and began browsing around. I looked at propellers, tools, and all sorts of neat stuff that can be found. I was happy to look at all kinds of things to let my mind wander in processing information. It is always good to learn what is available in the latest technologies besides what is basically eye candy kits and stuff. Good stuff is always in demand, even though an outrageous price can be set just for looking good.

I did see a few things that I dearly wanted but refrained from actually getting into my hands. Eye candy is designed to be hard to resist and almost always overpriced to the hilt. My experience at resisting temptation held me in good stead until I actually walked up to the cash register. My preordered goods were organized and bagged while I paid with that little debit card of plastic.

SPMR6610 DX6i DSMX 6 channel transmitter 1 159.99
KFLU4051 UMX Beast spinner 1 0.00
KFLU4067 UMX Beast prop adapter 1 0.00
KFLB1202s2 li-Po 120 mAH 7.4 volt 20C 1 0.00
KFLUPO50275 Ultra Micro Beast propeller 1 4.49

Goods Total 185.86

The receipt was stapled to a computer printout of the sales order and folded once before going into the white plastic bag holding all of the goodies. It was almost laughable that a big box and one tiny bag with a seven inch plastic propeller filled the interior of the shopping bag completely.

At this point, I had most of the equipment I would need to fly the sesquiplane in theory. I still needed a few critical things to be able to get started with actually balancing and placing everything within the fuselage of the Fokker DVII. Each visit to the hobby store was netting me tempting additions to the overall picture of that dream in my mind's eye about seeing the Fokker DVII doing a wingover during a full tilt flyby at low altitude. Yess!!

Back at home, I sat everything on my desktop and sat quietly for a while. I needed to come to terms with what I had, what I had already accomplished and what there was yet to complete in making my mental dream picture a reality. The most technical part of constructing my flying sesquiplane was now upon me as I began seriously considering what to do with what I had.

On the other hand, I still needed some critical things to make everything work. I needed a battery, a motor mount, and something else that I know I am forgetting. The battery is a trouble because there are none in stock and a long list of backordered requests would be ahead of my own request. I am tempted to do something a bit radical about the battery situation. For the sake of a special little coupling, no other type of battery would be compatible. Hm.

It is already very late in the evening and I do need to go to sleep. The simple necessity of adding drops to my eyes at two hour intervals will make me very cranky soon. The fact of a little bit of suffering for now is not a consideration considering that I will have greatly improved vision when all is said and done.

20110422

21 April 2011

I had a call today from the hobby shop I deal with. They had received a brushless motor for the balsa wood plane I am building and converting from a rubber band flyer to being a full remote control sesquiplane. I don't know anything about remote controls or how to put it all together. It is a big leap of faith that I can actually learn enough to put it altogether and make it fly as I have hoped it would. I am a big dreamer sometimes.

You wouldn't think I have spent too much for what I have so far. It has cost me about $12.00 for the balsa wood, bass wood, and glue. My dream of actually seeing this sesquiplane take off by itself is suddenly getting expensive very quickly. I spent far more than what I had thought possible for my cheap little project. I am building a 1/16 scale balsa wood kit originally by Guillow's Manufacturing but actually built from scratch. I already know the sesquiplane is a wonderful glider, so there is a basis for my hope of flying it.

So far I have sunk a lot of thought, learning and patience into the building of this balsa wood project so far.

EFLUM180BL BL180 Brushless motor 2300kv 36.99
SPMR6610 DX6i DSMX 6 channel transmitter 159.99
SPMAR6400B AR6400 w/Lin Sx/BL KSC/x-port 69.99
DUB107 Control Horns - 1/2A (2) 2.38
CSTT3234 Carbon Micro Rod .080 x 4' 5.29

total cost 274.64


The cost of today's venture into the hobby shop was another little surprise. I became the proud owner of a brushless motor about the size of a quarter in diameter and about half an inch long. The weight of the little motor is amazingly heavy considering how small it is. The little electric motor hooks up to a circuit board about an inch and a half wide and about two inches long. That in turn hooks up to a tiny battery. I will have to make the control rods myself and hook them into the actuators to connect the elevators and rudder. I do hope it will be within my capabilities to actually get working. Oh, I forgot...

EFLUM180BL BL180 Brushless Motor 2300kv Goods Total: 36.99
HST: 4.81
Invoice Total: 41.80

I haven't been able to get to sleep so far tonight. I am wild with the thoughts of putting everything together into the Fokker DVII that I have yet to make a hatch cover for the battery access and then paper the whole thing and paint it something other than the bright red as suggested. I don't really want to fly a bright red sesquiplane if I can help it. But, it leads me into the vast array of camouflage colours that were used way back in 1917. I will have to really think about that one.

It wasn't so hard to get into building with balsa wood. It is so easily shaped and can be used for all kinds of things. I have begun by building the first Fokker DVII kit by Guillow's as a birthday present. Now, I have built eight other balsa wood kit planes and a dozen HO scale buildings. It really is interesting to get the details just right from whatever research I have been able to do. It is a very time consuming activity that actually has helped me learn about buildings and aircraft. More importantly, it has kept me busy at doing something I find very absorbing and interesting. Hm.

20110419

18 April 2011

It has been a steady work in progress to straighten balsa wood forms and spars warping out of alignment. It would be a disaster to let any warp change the base alignment of the fuselage or wings of the Fokker DVII. Yet, some fuselage warping has become apparent nearing the completion of the fuselage construction. The bottom and top of the fuselage are out of alignment by a visible amount.

So much effort and time has been spent upon the balsa wood project so far that it would be a shame to see my efforts go to waste simply because of a minor lack of attention or care. The trouble is to rewarp the balsa wood fuselage spars back into alignment. It will mean many sessions of simply holding the balsa wood forms in place until glue sets and dries enough to hold the balsa wood in it's new position. I do not look foreward to that exercise of physical patience.

I have spent many nights dreaming of alternatives, solutions, and the technology needed to convert the rubber band powered scale Fokker DVII glider into a more modern remote control electric powered flyer. So far, I have heard that there are two clearly opposed opinions of the conversion of the classic balsa wood scale model . My own opinion has clearly not considered the physical and technological obstacles involved in the conversion
of any balsa wood scale model rubber band powered glider.

I started building the balsa wood scaled conversion project by following the plans of a previously built kit version Fokker DVII sesquiplane by the famous Guillow's Manufacturing Company. It was enjoyable to perform the tedious exercise of cutting my own lengths of balsa wood lumber from sheets of thin balsa wood stock. It was more enjoyable to fashion the fuselage and wings. However, I soon learned that I had to adapt to unexpected limitations of balsa wood and wood glue.

It was a matter of experience to find a glue that would hold together under rough handling. I resorted to using a metal and wood cement for models by Testor Corporation. And, a corresponding increase in strength was necessary for critical areas of the fuselage and wings. Repeated breaking was repaired with bass wood, a much heavier hardwood than the pithe of balsa wood.

I did give considerable thought to building the entire scale model out of bass wood. The result would have been a very sturdy construction at the expense of a considerable increase in weight. It would have been a worthy modelling project with questionable glider flight characteristics. The extra weight and corresponding difficulty in carving, would be offset by an increased size of electric battery and motor resulting in a much faster and more powerful remote control flyer.

The construction of a combination of balsa wood with bits of bass wood strengthening is still unquestionably a glider by tested design following the Guillow's Manufacturing Company kit plans. My reward so far has been the relatively easy construction of a worthy looking balsa wood scale model kit version of a Fokker DVII sesquiplane.

At the present time, only the bare wood frame of the Fokker DVII shows as a result of my efforts. I have yet to begin the real acquisition of the equipment and materials needed for the radio controlled aspect of the balsa wood project. It seems that there are so many new options available for the types of equipment to be purchased. I do have to research the facts concerning the types of actuators and controls that will be used to power the
elevators and rudder of the Fokker DVII as it flies.

I had thought of buying a complete kit with a ready to fly sort of plane just to scavenge the parts that I would need to incorporate into the constructed frame of the sesquiplane. Only then would I be able to begin papering the outer surfaces. Once papered, the sesquiplane could be painted and detail finished. It is an easy enough plan, barring the unforseen challenges of acquiring the radio controlled equipment. Hm.

NB:
balsa wood sheet stock
bass wood sheet stock
isothiocyanate cement
files and sanding paper
Xacto knives
radio control equipment

It seems another month has slid past my home plate while I dozed off at the wheel again. I am now recovering from blood clots in my lungs, of all things. And, I complicated everything with having cataract surgery on my right eye. I can see better without my corrective glasses now. The only real worry I have is that I am on blood thinners that allow bruising ever so easily.

I have spent better than six months at building my little balsa wood Fokker DVII sesquiplane. I don't think about the time that is going by while my life is busy in handling my health issues. I do think about the time I have spent in hobby shops while chasing down all of the remote control equipment I would need. It becomes very complex and expensive in a proportional hurry.

The best option I have been offered so far is to buy a complete kit and scrap the plane for parts I need. I can spend at least $170 for a kit plane of the same weight and size as the Fokker DVII. Then it would be a matter of learning how to fly with something I will tear apart later. But then, maybe I can learn what I do need to buy as in replacement parts to get my dear warbird in the air.

So far, I have added the nylon hinges to the rear elevators and rudder. The nylon hinges work as hinges do and show up the alignment of how I set the hinges. I have had to trim the elevators to bevel the edges so that they can swing up and down freely. My mistake was in setting the nylon hinges on only one side of the tail section instead of centering the hinges into the tail section. Each elevator has its own two hinges so that it will operate independently. At least it is easy to keep the balance centered upon the alignment.

Speaking of alignment, I should check how things stand with what I have built already. I know I have tried to follow the plans as closely as I could. I also know it only takes a bit of balsa wood in the wrong place to upset the precious balance. And, I have yet to add the remote control equipment. That will be a job and a half when it does come about.

I didn't know how much I would have to learn about things when I first started to build a conversion version of a beautiful sesquiplane. I am now thinking of the length of the horns to add to the elevators and rudder. Simple measuring means measuring the distance of actual movement of the movable parts. Then, there is the measuring of the actual length of the control rods from the positions of the actuators to the affixed control horns. Hm, where is my ruler now? Is it metric or standard? I forget.

The work on my balsa wood project proceeds in fits and spurts. I can’t seem to hold a steady pace with anything. One day I can accomplish a whole lot of engineering and construction while the next day is a complete loss. I might work for a day and the rest of the week is wasted without a thought of doing anything. In actual fact, the only real work I seem to be able to get done is to build an imaginary farm called Farmville.

One day I was brilliant enough to take my Fokker DVII down to the hobby shop and say, “Here is what I am doing. What do I need to get this project flying as I intended it to do?” The six foot and four inch tall clerk looked down upon me as if a teacher to a student. It was definitely a fact that school was in session from that moment onwards.

The next hour was crammed with a crash course in putting together a remote control system that I would need for the size and weight of the Fokker DVII. The complexity of the remote control equipment was explained to me and simplified with examples of prebuilt kits. I was thankful for the education I received from the store representative.

It helped me to break down the entire remote control system into four basic areas of concern. The first concern is the type and size of an electric motor to power the craft in flight. The second area of concern is the circuit board mounted with the motor speed controller, the radio receiver, and the dual actuators that would move the elevators and rudder. The third area concerns the control rods that would connect the remote control actuators to the elevators and rudder. The fourth areas of concern are the elevators and rudder.

Simplifying something that is complex doesn’t always make it any easier to manage. The remote control system is only a fraction of the entire engineering project that amounts to the overall redesigned capabilities of the rubber band powered glider turned into a remote controlled electric motor powered flying sesquiplane. As wonderful as it seems in presentation, the project of the Fokker DVII isn’t entirely complete nor finished. I do have a considerable amount of work yet to do before that first flight could ever happen.

I had started off with a twelve dollar kit of balsa wood that would enable me to build a rubber band powered sesquiplane. The design of the balsa wood glider was such that it would fly an amazing distance in a level and straight flight. The balance and flying characteristics were a part of the design of the sesquiplane. I merely wanted to take the same design of sesquiplane and add remote control equipment. I didn’t think of the actual engineering that would be needed to equip the sesquiplane with the necessary control and power to fly successfully. Right.

The twelve dollar balsa wood sesquiplane suddenly took on a rapidly accruing expense. The interior of the fuselage would take on an electric motor and circuit board with a motor speed controller, a radio receiver, and two actuators for a total price of about one hundred and ten dollars. Then add the cost of control rods and control horns for about six dollars. The real expense is in the remote control radio transmitter control for about one hundred and seventy dollars. I know that there is the added expense of batteries, battery charger, and plug adapters. I know I am missing things that are yet to be added to the toolbox and equipment list.

Summary of parts and purchases 12 April 2011

EFLUM180BL BL180 Brushless motor 2300kv 36.99
SPMR6610 DX6i DSMX 6 channel transmitter 159.99
SPMAR6400B AR6400 w/Lin Sx/BL KSC/x-port 69.99
DUB107 Control Horns - 1/2A (2) 2.38
CSTT3234 Carbon Micro Rod .080 x 4' 5.29

total cost 274.64


I thought to add the list of purchases I have made to ease the way for anyone who might want to adapt their own balsa wood rubber band powered aircraft to become a remote control micro park flyer. The hardest part of everything is to adapt the right size of an electric motor to be able to handle the weight to power ratio for proper flight. Experience is all that is needed to build the remote control equipment into whatever project you have in mind.

It is a fact that I have handled the balsa wood sesquiplane a lot in constructing it and in transporting it around to the few hobby shops in my area. It doesn’t seem to matter that I have so much familiarity with the fuselage and wings of the Fokker DVII. It is almost inevitable to have something break or separate at a glue joint. It has prompted me to take along a cutting knife, a flat file, and a tube of glue on my rare travels out of the house.

There has been a steady list of breakages resulting from my clumsy fingers and accidental impacts with mostly door frames and floors. Unbelievably, it has been my fingers that have caused the greatest amount of breakages. I can’t help thinking of reinforcing the handling areas of the fuselage and wings to prevent those unwanted breakages. In a few breakage incidents, I have been able to redesign the weak points or simply add bass wood instead of fragile balsa wood.

It is one thing to build something to play with and then spend a considerable time doing minor repairs that would plague the enjoyment of playing. I have the idea that once something is built, that it should have a reasonable survivability and be free of those little annoyances and breakages. The construction I have been doing has been basically to follow the plans laid out in the Paul K Guillow’s Manufacturing schematic plans. I am happy with the overall results of my efforts because only in a few instances have I resorted to using bass wood instead of balsa wood .

I have thought about the placement of the circuit board and the electric motor. I have to keep the balance of the fuselage with each placement. The actuators and battery have to be put where the point of balance for each is evened out. Then, I have to place the reinforced carbon fiber rods to connect the actuators with the elevators and rudder. It seems easy enough to do, but there are inherent troubles that have to be solved.
The carbon fiber rods need to be cut into equal lengths. Each length has to be prepared for fitting into place with reinforcements inside the fuselage. The ends of the carbon fiber rods have to be prepared with short wire extensions to hook into place. Literally a short piece of wire has to be moused and glued into place on the ends of the carbon fiber rods. The attached wire can be hooked exactly at the right length and be easily adjustable with only a pair of pliers. Care has to be exercised in the length of the connecting control rods and supports along the length to prevent flexing. It is important to ensure stable control rods to have reliable flight controls.